Home Sports FIFA to release report on corruption in W/Cup bidding

FIFA to release report on corruption in W/Cup bidding

Sepp Blatter, the president of FIFA, announced the decision at a news conference in Morocco, at which he also said that the 2018 World Cup would take place in Russia as planned, and that the 2022 event would remain in Qatar, because there were no legal grounds for a revote.
Blatter had been one of the primary figures to oppose the release of the report. But, speaking on Friday after a meeting of FIFA’s executive committee, he said, “We have always been determined that the truth should be known.”
The report will be redacted to protect certain measures of privacy and will not be released until it can be ensured that the investigations into some of the individuals found to have committed ethics violations are closed.
Garcia resigned from his position on Wednesday after conflicts with Hans-Joachim Eckert, the German judge who was his judiciary counterpart on the ethics committee.
The divide stemmed, in large part, from Garcia’s frustration over Eckert’s summary of the ethics report, which was initially the only aspect of the investigation that was required to be made public. In his summary, Eckert said the violations that Garcia had found were small in scope, and he recommended that the matter be closed.
Garcia, a former federal prosecutor, disagreed with that assessment of his work and resigned after losing an appeal he had filed with FIFA’s appeals committee.
Blatter said that Cornel Borbély, Garcia’s former deputy, would fill Garcia’s role on an interim basis and added that the work by Garcia was important.
While there will not be a revote on the host countries for the next two World Cups — “the report is about history, and I am focused on the future,” Blatter said — the FIFA president also added that the investigation had inspired crucial changes, although he did not elaborate.
“We are already in the process of incorporating recommendations made by independent experts,” Blatter said. “Everyone can be confident that the 2026 bidding process will be fair, ethical and open.”

NO COMMENTS

Leave a Reply